LL1028-series Saurian Sector Explorer

In making dinosaur-inspired equivalents for many of the old Classic Space sets from the Dawn of Time (at least as far as Lego Space goes), sooner or later I was going to have to make something equivalent to the big mama of original Classic Space sets, the LL928. Known in Europe as set 928, the Space Cruiser and Moonbase, in the US the same set went by the name and number of 497 Galaxy Explorer. Both had the same “LL928” printed on the side, though.

It’s to this that Benny’s Spaceship Spaceship SPACESHIP!! from the Lego Movie refers with its “LL929” hull number. I decided that since this was already taken, that I would modify the original set code number in a different way; hence, “LL1028″.

I’m a Brit, but the name “Galaxy Explorer” seems to work better in my unified backstory, so I guess that settles it. In my corner of the Classic Space universe, the original LL928 is the Galaxy Explorer, while my “dynamic equivalent” is the LL1028 Saurian Sector Explorer.


With the discovery of the dangerous Saurian Sector, the Galactic Federation’s Space Fleet Command recognised the need for a more combat-capable spaceship than the old LL928 series Galaxy Explorer to serve as a primary exploration and transport vessel. The Saurian Sector not only had many rugged planets with inimical local lifeforms, but also spacegoing dangers such as the hostile Cephalon Dominion and Neo-Blacktron incursions from their nearby base world Sardis. After several LL928-class vessels disappeared along the edges of Cephalon space, the Sector’s commanding officer Admiral Thera took to radical means to combat this threat.

The various Sector commands already had a great deal of local autonomy in ship design, and with the establishment of Saurian Space Command, a new generation of primary explorer ship entered service: the LL1028 series Saurian Sector Explorer, sometimes called the Pliosaur-class. Like much of the hardware of the Federation in the Saurian Sector, the LL1028 has a design based on an extinct Earth creature: in this case, the marine reptile that gave the class its name. It was a rarity among Sector Commands to attempt a redesign of a ship as ubiquitous and successful as the LL928-series, but the realities of life in the Saurian Sector left little alternative.

The LL1028-series "Pliosaur" spaceship replaces the old LL928-series in the Saurian Sector

The LL1028-series “Pliosaur” spaceship replaces the old LL928-series in the Saurian Sector

In common with the LL928 Explorer, the LL1028 model has a large crew section and a rear cargo compartment able to carry a small surface vehicle. However, due to the rugged nature of many of the Sector’s worlds, the Pliosaur-class eschewed the LL928’s rover in favour of a miniature mech of the VLC Corporation’s Troodon design.

LL1028 landed, with Troodon

LL1028 landed, with Troodon

The four main engines of the LL1028 are mounted on omnidirectional fins, giving the vessel a combination of speed and agility unmatched in most ships its size and adding considerably to its combat power. This design also proved necessary for safe takeoff and landing in the rugged terrain of Saurian Sector planets.

After aspect showing the drop-down ramp

After aspect showing the drop-down ramp

The other factor in the LL1028’s battle effectiveness is its massively increased armament over the LL928. The old Explorer class was deliberately designed with minimal armament to avoid provocation, but in the hostile Saurian Sector, such moves were often taken as weakness and an invitation to attack. The Pliosaur-class has a cluster of four antimatter lasers attached to each of its engine mounts, a dorsal turret featuring another four antimatter lasers, plus a bank of four regular lasers beneath the cockpit and another six rear-firing lasers aft.

Front view with cockpit.  There are internal hatches allowing access from the cockpit to the passenger area and the passenger area to the cargo bay.

Front view with cockpit. There are internal hatches allowing access from the cockpit to the passenger area and the passenger area to the cargo bay.

The forward cockpit opens up, and is connected to the main crew compartment by a secondary hatch. Another crew hatch leads from there into the interior of the cargo bay. In addition, the main crew compartment opens up for easy access to the ship, and the cargo bay is acessible from the outside by a drop-down ramp.

View into the main passenger compartment.

View into the main passenger compartment.

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