Category Archives: LEGO Star Wars

Stand By Ion Control…

The giant Rebel ion cannon of planet Hoth was iconic enough that it got a Ralph McQuarrie painting all to itself. Not bad for less than two minutes of screen time in The Empire Strikes Back.

It occurred to me that the cup-and-ball cannon mounts might make a pretty good microscale version of the Star Destroyer-disabling planetary defence cannon. All that was needed was to enclose it somehow in an ice-carved turret.

I think 2×3 wing elements might have worked better for the enclosing turret, but I don’t have enough of those in white, and any other colour would look silly.

Even with all the white in use on my Ice Planet battle fleet, I still had enough left over to build a small baseplate and surround. And I put some transparent bricks together to simulate its firing, too.

This isn’t a huge or complex model, and I’m too impatient to wait for a Bricklink order of 2×3 left wings to make it look better. The toothed elements aren’t too bad; at least they add to the icy look.

Anyway, here it is. Enjoy.

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Green X

Fellow LEGO blogger Vaderfan2187 has been recently posting pics of Star Wars hardware recoloured for the

Ninjago ninja (the three posts covering the six main ninja can be seen here, here and here).

Excited about this awesomely original crossover concept, I decided to crash the party by building my own.

Lloyd’s X-Wing

Kai’s my favourite of the Ninja, and I was mostly expecting to build a vehicle for him, but then that stickered green curve element caught my eye.

So pretty-boy Lloyd is the one who gets the X-Wing, despite him being my least favourite.

Where Vaderfan2187’s creations were mostly simple recolours hewing much more closely to their far-far-away galactic originals, I’ve taken a slightly different route and more thoroughly Ninjified (Ninjagified? Ninjated?) the Original Trilogy X-Wing I selected as the base vehicle.

This is a full-on custom build, obviously, rather than a rebuild or modification of a set. The height of the rear section relative to the cockpit is slightly off compared to the movie X-Wing, but it was the only way I could get those gold Ninjago-set Technic wheel hubs to work as the engine intakes.

For extra Ninja coolness, I replaced the X-Wing’s wingtip cannons with gold blade elements, and added the hooked Bionicle sword blades alongside the forward section.

All too many of my interesting black elements are still in use on the Blacktron Thunderbolt, which remains standing after nearly two weeks, which is closing in on a record where my MOCmaking is concerned. Be that as it may, it meant I had to use some dark grey as well as black for a base structural colour palette, and eke out the scheme with a little dark red, recalling the saddle on the Green NRG Dragon. The yellow cockpit was the only realistic choice, and I think it works well. I think trans yellow would work with Kai or Jay too, though probably not Cole, Zane or Nya.

It seemed especially appropriate to use one of the Green NRG Dragon’s massive feet as a stand. It’s a little delicate, but I’ll put up with delicate for a stand so in keeping with the nature of the model.

Anyway, here’s Lloyd’s Green Ninja X-Wing. I’m not sure how (or if) it fires, given that I removed the turbolasers and put blades in their place. Maybe it meshes with Lloyd’s green ninja energy somehow and can shoot out bolts of power from the hull itself the way Lloyd himself can from his body.

Where the AT-ATs Roam

Sooner or later, every LEGO builder who’s any sort of Star Wars fan is going to attempt an AT-AT at something more substantial than palmtop scale.

This is my first try.

Star Wars vehicles, scenes, characters and battles have been modeled again and again to such a high standard of accuracy and modelling that really, you need massive chutzpah to attempt anything from the Star Wars universe. Especially something from the films; especially from the Original Trilogy.

This obviously isn’t going to be winning any prizes on Eurobricks’ Star Wars forum or anything, what with its general studdiness and too-long back end, but as a first attempt, “you-too-can-build-the-AT-AT” model, it’s reasonable.

I actually wasn’t really considering building an AT-AT at all; this whole build started out with the microscale snowspeeder (with which I’m actually more pleased than the big Imperial walker).

But having built this little speeder, it occurred to me that it might be possible, with my household’s relatively-limited-for-an-AFOL brick inventory, to build an Imperial walker to proper scale with the speeder.

Official LEGO’s never done this. I’d actually love to see someone build an AT-AT to full minifig scale based on the size of one of the snowspeeder sets, but the sheer size of it probably prevents all but the most dedicated builder, and with all the expanses of plate armour the hull’s actually fairly uninteresting at that scale.

Still, what I can only dream about at minifig scale I can finally actually build at microscale.

If I was building it again I’d correct that too-long rear end, but I don’t possess enough tiles to successfully destud it having used this construction method, and I don’t possess enough grey 1xwhatever bricks to build it using the other main technique family for producing a smooth finish.

Ah well. Steps on the path, my friends. Steps on the path. This build was mostly about getting past the intimidation factor of all the really huge $120+ official AT-AT sets and the even huger and more detailed Imperial walker MOCs; a figuring-out that really, building an AT-AT doesn’t have to be that hard.

I think a lot of my mental hangups come from my childhood attempts to build one back when The Empire Strikes Back was a new film and we were still waiting with bated breath for Revenge of the Jedi, as rumour had it the next film would be called.

Trying to make an articulated All Terrain Armoured Transport that would actually stand up back when the black Technic friction pins were a nonexistent brick was way beyond my youthful skill level. I wasn’t about to build a statue; if I was building it, it was going to move. But I couldn’t find a way to keep it from sprawling on the ice like a giant robot Bambi, so I eventually gave up on the idea as an impossibility with the bricks of the era.

And I’ve carried that sense that building AT-ATs is one of the hardest challenges facing any builder with me through all those years.

So here’s an AT-AT. Not a very good one, perhaps, but here it is.

And it really wasn’t hard at all.

Now, a Mon Calamari battlecruiser, with all those lovely stylish curves? That would be truly difficult!

Sanctuary Moon

A break from the Classic Space and Blacktron modes, but not from sci-fi, this Star Wars Original Trilogy build is unusual for me on several counts.

Number one, it’s vegetation. I’m not a great builder of vegetation; my trees are pretty simplistic and I don’t have a huge amount of the various leafy green elements that make good cround cover. This build used about 90% of my inventory.

I always feel like to get good at vegetation I need more plant parts and elements that would be good treetrunk and so on, but because I so seldom build very much with vegetation I never actually purchase any more. It’s a bit of a vicious cycle.

Anyway, Endor is a forested moon, and needs lots of vegetation even at microscale. I’m satisfied, at least, with how it’s turned out.

Number two, it’s microscale with actual human figures, a first for me.

I’ve never really liked the “stack of 1×1 round bricks = human” approach; it’s about the best possible approach at that scale but part of my mind always rebels at it.

This time, though, I’ve used it myself for Luke and Leia in the foreground.

Number three, it uses a technically “illegal” technique, also a rarity for me. The scout troopers’ heads are not properly attached, just jammed onto the ends of the black barbs forming the necks. It’s not that I don’t approve of “illegal” (ie “you’ll never see this done in an official set”) techniques, but I just seldom think of them in building context. A lot of the techniques seriously stress or deform the element, and I don’t have the inventory to sacrifice to the resultant breakages. I’ll need those bricks later.

This creation began as something else entirely. I was haphazardly putting bricks together to build a microscale space fighter when my visiting nephew said “that looks like an X-Wing”. A flurry of “Build a TIE Fighter!”, “Build a Star Destroyer!” followed, and I found myself putting bricks together for a microscale speeder bike.

The white clip elements from the “Mighty Dinosaurs” Creator set seemed like perfect Scout Trooper bodies, but I had to try several different things before I came up with this design for the heads.

And then an Endor scene just naturally followed, with a second speeder bike and a massive tree and underbrush. Putting in Luke and Leia just completed the Return of the Jedi scene. ┬áThe giant mushroom in the back isn’t official canon, but I wouldn’t be surprised.

The Darth Mall

One of the great things about LEGO is the opportunity to be silly. And it doesn’t get much sillier than ridiculous puns.

I’ve joked about our local shopping centre being “the Darth Mall”, usually around Christmas when it really is. So when considering whether to get the Duel on Naboo set with birthday money, I had to have a go at building it for real.

The thing is, C-3PO and R2-D2 make a far better pair of shoppers than Darth Maul.

Obviously there’s not a lot to say about this sort of creation, but I’m quite pleased with the shopping trolley.

Building Together

All three of my kids love LEGO, but of the three of them, my son is probably the biggest fan.

One of the main ways we spend time together, in fact, is building together, though it often deteriorates into him providing the ideas and direction and me making it work the way he wants it to be. Of such collaboration have many dragons and mechs and Ninja machines been built.

This was a different kettle of sushi.

Father-and-son building time

He’s a fan of the Star Wars Microfighters game on LEGO.com, and so when he asked me to build him a TIE fighter microfighter I smiled and said “You’re a good builder. You can build it yourself”.

So he did. Then he had me build the X-Wing, which is obviously an AFOL’s creation on the Microfighter theme rather than a nearly-six-year-old’s, but allowed him two ships to have a battle with.

And really, X-Wings are hard. I remember that from my own childhood before there was a set for that.

A few days later I came home from work to discover that he’d made this lovely little charging/refueling/repair station all by himself. No help with the concept, nothing. Absolutely brilliant!

Of course, it’s a bit more rainbow than I’d have tolerated even as a six-year-old, but that’s at leas partly a legacy of my wife. A non-builder with the attention to detail that makes a really superb brickfinder, she had no patience at all with his Daddylike early insistence on everything being the right colour as well as the right shape and carefully wore down his resistance to the Rainbow Warrior concept.

I’m particularly fond of the crates of tools, but the whole thing oozes brilliance.

So I’m trying something very difficult. I’m trying to stop my itchy AFOL builder’s hands from taking over and let him build his own stuff.

…And I thought they smelt bad on the outside!

With this model I return to something I usually seem to enjoy: small models.

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Luke Skywalker riding a tauntaun is hard to pull off at minifig scale; at least, when you don’t have a proper tauntaun. I’m fairly happy with how this built one has turned out.

You’ve got to admire a creature that can handle Hoth’s extreme cold better than an unmodified speeder; remember that when Luke didn’t get back to Echo Base, they couldn’t go and look for him in their speeders because of issues with adapting them to the cold.

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We see that even tauntauns can keel over and die of hypothermia, but the fact that you can take a tauntaun out into weather that will ground a speeder is impressive. Hardy little beasts, these things are. And they don’t need much in the way of support infrastructure the way machines do.

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It’s actually one of the better features of the original trilogy. High-tech blasters and space fighters work alongside domesticated animals, which are used in the sorts of situations in which you’d be likely to find them: poor, lower-tech regions and situations in which you might not want to reveal your presence with too many high energy signatures.

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Anyway, here’s Luke on a tauntaun. Enjoy.

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